Sunday, the 8th of March, 2015 is the 67th day in 2015 and in the 10th calendar week.
General Events:
International Women’s Day
March 8, 2015 in the World
International Women’s Day (IWD), also called International Working Women’s Day, is celebrated on March 8 every year. In different regions the focus of the celebrations ranges from general celebration of respect, appreciation and love towards women to a celebration for women’s economic, political, and social achievements. Started as a Socialist political event, the holiday blended in the culture of many countries, primarily in Europe, including Russia.
In some regions, the day lost its political flavor, and became simply an occasion for men to express their love for women in a way somewhat similar to a mixture of Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day. In other regions, however, the political and human rights theme designated by the United Nations runs strong, and political and social awareness of the struggles of women worldwide are brought out and examined in a hopeful manner. This is a day which some people celebrate by wearing purple ribbons.
History of International Women’s Day: http://www.un.org/womenwatch/feature/iwd/history.html
Where is International Women’s Day?
Worldwide
Daylight Saving Time
March 8, 2015 in North America
Most of the US, Canada and Mexico’s northern border cities will start Daylight Saving Time (DST) at 2 am (02:00) local time on March 08, 2015. The clocks will “spring forward” (by shifting the clock forward) an hour to daylight time, so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less. The most of Europe will start DST on the last Sunday in March. Most of North America shifts at 02:00 local time, so its zones do not shift at the same time; for example, Mountain Time can be temporarily either zero or two hours ahead of Pacific Time.
Daylight saving time – also summer time in several countries – is the practice of advancing clocks so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less. Typically clocks are adjusted forward one hour near the start of spring and are adjusted backward in autumn. The modern idea of daylight saving was first implemented during the First World War. Many countries have used it at various times since then.
The practice has been both praised and criticized. Adding daylight to evenings benefits retailing, sports, and other activities that exploit sunlight after working hours, but can cause problems for evening entertainment and other occupations tied to the sun. Although an early goal of DST was to reduce evening usage of incandescent lighting, formerly a primary use of electricity, modern heating and cooling usage patterns differ greatly, and research about how Daylight Saving Time currently affects energy use is limited or contradictory.
Starting in 2007, most of the United States and Canada observe DST from the second Sunday in March to the first Sundayin November, almost two-thirds of the year. The 2007 US change was part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005; previously, from 1987 through 2006, the start and end dates were the first Sunday in April and the last Sunday in October, and Congress retains the right to go back to the previous dates now that an energy-consumption study has been done.
DST clock shifts present other challenges. They complicate timekeeping, and can disrupt meetings, travel, billing, recordkeeping, medical devices, heavy equipment, and sleep patterns. Software can often adjust computer clocks automatically, but this can be limited and error-prone, particularly when Daylight Saving Time protocols are changed.
Where is Daylight Saving Time?
Nationwide North America
Check Your Batteries Day
March 8, 2015 in North America
Today is Check Your Batteries Day. This annual “holiday” is observed on the second Sunday in March, which just so happens to coincide with Daylight Saving Time.
Check Your Batteries Day serves as an important reminder to test and replace the batteries on those very important life-saving devices like smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Deaths from fires and burns are the third leading cause of fatal home injury.” In 2010, one American died in a fire every 169 minutes!
Where is the event?
Nationwide North America
Girls Write Now Day
March 8, 2015 in New York, USA
Girls Write Now is a nonprofit organization serving at-risk girls from New York City public high schools. It was founded by Maya Nussbaum, now Executive Director, in 1998 during her senior year at Columbia University.[1] As part of its core mentoring program, Girls Write Now matches young women from disadvantaged backgrounds who are interested in writing with professional women writers.[2] In 2009, the Girls Write Now mentoring program was recognized by the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities as an outstanding arts program for youth, and received the Coming Up Taller Award.
Where is the event?
Nationwide New York, USA
 National Peanut Cluster Day
March 8, 2015 in the USA
This annually celebrated food holiday is all about melted chocolate mixed with peanuts that is a perfect combination for a sweet and salty deliciousness!
Peanut clusters are an easy to make snack that can be ready in just minutes.  Melt the chocolate, add in your peanuts, stir them together, drop them by spoonfuls into a “cluster” on waxed paper or foil, let them harden and then ENJOY!!  Remember to share!
These tasty crunchy treats have been around for many years dating back to before 1912 when they were made popular by the Goo Goo Cluster.  The Goo Goo Cluster candy bar is a peanut cluster that had marshmallow and caramel mixed with the chocolate and peanuts.
Where is the event?
Nationwide USA
Historical Events on 8th March:
1658 – Peace of Roskilde between Sweden & Denmark
1782 – Gnadenhutten Massacre – Ohio militia kills 90 indians
1801 – British drive French forces from Abukir, Egypt
1867 – The British North America Act is passed in the House of Commons, and would serve as a constitution for Canada for the next 100 years
1884 – Susan B. Anthony addresses the U.S. House Judiciary Committee arguing for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution granting women the right to vote. Anthony’s argument came 16 years after legislators had first introduced a federal women’s suffrage amendment.
1911 – International Women’s Day is launched in Copenhagen, Denmark, by Clara Zetkin, leader of the Women’s Office for the Social Democratic Party in Germany.
1918 – The first case of Spanish flu occurs, the start of a devastating worldwide pandemic
1934 – Edwin Hubble photo shows as many galaxies as Milky Way has stars
1945 – International Women’s Day is 1st observed
1953 – USA Census indicates 239,000 farmers gave up farming in last 2 years
1964 – Malcolm X resigns from the Nation of Islam
1972 – 1st flight of the Goodyear blimp
1976 – 1,774 kg (largest observed) stony meteorite falls in Jilin, China
1979 – China withdraws invasion troops from Vietnam
2004 – A new constitution is signed by Iraq’s Governing Council